• Using data from our HEAF study we have shown that pre-frailty and frailty are relatively common amongst adults aged 50-64 years, and importantly associated with being unable to work to older ages (10-fold and 30-fold).
  • Using data from the Hertfordshire cohort study we have shown that men who have undertaken heavy manual work throughout their working life are no better off, in terms of muscle strength, at retirement age, and in fact have poorer grip strength than men who have done office-based work.
  • The CUPID study has shown that most people (95%) at work who report low back pain do not ONLY have low back pain but usually also report pain at other anatomical sites.  The 5% with localised back pain had a different risk factor profile to this group. This suggests that the ergonomic-focussed interventions for low back pain will be suitable for prevention of localised low back pain but that they are unlikely to make a major impact on non-localised low back pain (that is in 95% of cases) in whom attention to mental health and psychosocial risk factors is likely to be more effective.
  • In a multicentre RCT which allowed for comparison of different types of advice and early vs delayed physiotherapy, we have shown that advice to remain active, as opposed to usual advice to rest, leads to improved outcomes in terms of function at 6 months amongst people referred to physiotherapy with pain in the elbow, forearm, wrist and hand.
  • Job satisfaction is known to be important in retaining older workers.  Using data from our HEAF study we showed that job dissatisfaction was associated with feeling unappreciated or lacking a sense of achievement and also with poorer self-rated health, mental health and lower wellbeing. We identified factors that employers could influence or change to maximise satisfaction and retain workers include relationships in the workplace, fairness, job security and instilling a sense of achievement.